Putting up decking, or other raised platforms, in your garden is permitted development, not needing an application for planning permission, providing: The decking is no more than 30cm above the ground; together with other extensions, outbuildings etc, the decking or platforms cover no more than 50 per cent of the garden area.

Look at some of the benefits: Extra … As a general rule from the 1st October 2008, garden structures (including pergolas) do not require planning permission as long as the following points are followed:- 1) No structure forward of the principle elevation fronting a highway. Both types of pergola are, in effect, frames fro climbing plants and vines that surround the occupants with foliage, flowers and aromas and offer a measure of protection from the weather and some privacy in urban areas. If your porch meets these rules, you automatically have planning permission and don't have to apply for it. If a pergola is on your home improvement wish list, read on and find out what you need to know about council approvals for building a pergola. Though you may be advised by friends or family that a permit is not required, it won’t be them paying the fine or having to remove the structure if it turns out that you do. Areas where there may be a planning condition, Article 4 Direction or other restriction that limits permitted development rights Also note that these rules only cover your patio/driveway. Most porches don't need a planning permission application, because most meet a set of rules called 'permitted development'. Find out whether your home improvement or large scale commercial project needs planning permission or building regulations approval. Things to Keep in Mind while Planning a Pergola: 1. Pergola planning permission Once you know what type of pergola you want to have in your garden, you can then look at the practical considerations. When it comes time to building your deck or pergola, you will first need to make sure that you have approval from your local council. In addition if a building to which it relates is a listed building, then both planning permission and listed building consent would be required. There is also a process called Article 4 where local authorities have removed Permitted Development rights. Here's a useful checklist. Get an idea of where you want to place the pergola and then notify your utility companies to have them come mark your yard. If you're still concerned, check with your local Development Control … It's very unlikely to need planning permission, but there are some unusual circumstances where it is required. And the council (who are pretty snotty to be honest) have told us we can apply for planning permission but at the end of the day its unlikely to be passed because the 2m rule is the 2m rule. The good news is that council approval for building a pergola is not always necessary. Use our common projects and interactive guides to find out about permitted development limits or explore our in-depth guidance to understand about what you need to consider at each stage of your project. Any other work such as fences, walls and gates or a dropped kerb may require planning permission. This is the most important step and it is why I put I first in my list. Planning. Planning Permission & Garden Buildings We are very experienced regarding planning permission, call if you would like to chat through your ideas. Pergola It mustn't cover more than half of the area of your land.

2) Must be single storey with …